World Match Racing Tour. ALPARI

ISAF Special Event


  • Canfield wins Qualifying while six are set for battle in the Quarters
    Canfield wins Qualifying while six are set for battle in the Quarters

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  • Gilmour On A Roll
    Gilmour On A Roll

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  • Canfield Wins First Dutch Match Cup
    Canfield Wins First Dutch Match Cup

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    Lelystad, Netherlands (28th Sept 2014): Taylor Canfield and US One have won the inaugural Dutch Match Cup after a thrilling final against arch-rival Ian Williams and GAC Pindar. The breeze was very light and patchy, creating multiple opportunities for lead changes. No race lead, however big, was ever safe. Matches between the world’s top two match racing skippers are always aggressive affairs on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT). In the pre-start of the first match, Canfield stuck two penalties on Williams, leaving the British boat playing catch-up. However on the downwind leg, Williams found a sliver of stronger breeze by the harbour shore close to the cheering crowds in Lelystad. The British came close to rolling over the top of US One but failed to keep clear from a Canfield luff. Another penalty for Williams, then another penalty towards the leeward gate, and Canfield was uncatchable. 1-0. Pre start action between Ian Williams and Taylor Canfield in the finals of Dutch Match Cup © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT In the second match, Williams got the slightly better start and converted that into a five-length lead by the first windward mark. Canfield sailed over to the shore on the second beat and used the cheers of the crowd to waft him closer to Williams. GAC Pindar was still in the lead at the final turning mark, but US One again went shoreside and managed to sneak ahead of their opponent just before the finish. 2-0, and the Dutch Match Cup went to Canfield. In the Petit Final to determine 3rd overall, Mathieu Richard took the first match but David Gilmour bounced back to win the next two and secure his first podium finish at a Tour event. The LunaJets skipper will be kicking himself for some unforced errors earlier in the day, particularly at the finish of match 4 in his Semi Final against Williams. Richard had to offload a penalty at the finish, although he had a huge lead and was not under too much pressure. When the crew went to lower the spinnaker before turning up to begin their 270-degree penalty turn, the sail dropped in the water and started trawling behind the boat like a fishing net. In just 4 knots of wind, the boat’s all-important momentum was lost, the French boat hit the finish mark as they took their penalty around it, and Williams breezed past to secure his spot in the Final. A podium finish for David Gilmour - Team Gilmour © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT It was that kind of day - very, very easy to make mistakes or to fall into a hole as you watched your opponent sail on by. Gilmour took an easy win in his first Semi Final match against Canfield and was showing the kind of form that could have yielded overall victory. However in another match Gilmour seemed to have an unassailable lead but allowed too much separation on the final run. So often the chasing boat would take its chances by the shore, and would be frequently rewarded for doing so. You can’t give Canfield too much rope. Give him an inch, and he’ll take a mile, all done with an assassin’s smile. Back to back win for Taylor Canfield and his US One team © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT Canfield’s laid-back demeanour serves him well when the conditions get squirly. “It was never-say-die out there,” said Canfield, “and I have to pay tribute to my crew, Rod Dawson, Mike Rehe and Hayden Goodrick, for keeping at it, however we were doing in the race.” It was a vital win for the reigning World Champions who have a lot of work on to defend their crown against the frighteningly consistent GAC Pindar. Williams might have lost the battle, but the four-time World Champion is still winning the war. “Of course we’re disappointed not to have won here today, but we’re pleased to have made this the sixth final in a row that we’ve reached on the Tour, stretching back to Monsoon Cup last year. Congratulations to Taylor and US One, they sailed extremely well, and we look forward to the next one.” That ‘next one’ is the Argo Group Gold Cup in Bermuda in three weeks’ time. After the light and responsive Maxfun25s used in Lelystad, the larger and heavier International One Designs present a different kind of challenge. This was the first time that Holland has been represented on the Tour, and Canfield paid tribute to the organisers and people of Lelystad. “This has been a fantastic event, great people, great racing, and we can’t wait to come back next year.” To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Access all of today’s imagery via wmrt.photoshelter.com For downloading pictures use the password: awmrt Overall results of Stage 5 Dutch Match Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour 1 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One2 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar3 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour4 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets5 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari6 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing7 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman8 Björn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team9 Joachim Aschenbrenner (DEN) Aschenbrenner Racing Team10 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NLD) Opportunity Team11 Philip Bendon (IRL) Glenmar Racing Team12 Klaartje Zuiderbaan (NLD) Team BSC FinalsTaylor Canfield (ISV) US One beat Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 2-0 Petit-FinalsDavid Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour beat Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 2-1 Semi FinalsTaylor Canfield (ISV) US One beat David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 3-1Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar beat Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 3-1 Quarter FinalsMathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets beat Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman 3-1David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour beat Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 3-0Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar beat Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 3-2 Qualifying1 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 9-22 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 8-33 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 7.5-34 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 7-45 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 7-46 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 7-47 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman 6-58 Björn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 4.5-69 Joachim Aschenbrenner (DEN) Aschenbrenner Racing Team 4-710 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NLD) Opportunity Team 2-911 Philip Bendon (IRL) Glenmar Racing Team 2-912 Klaartje Zuiderbaan (NLD) Team BSC 1-10 2014 Leaderboard Standings after Stage 51 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 94pts2 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 88pts 3 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 76pts4 Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing 63pts5 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 58pts6 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 56pts7 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 39pts8 Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa 20pts FULL RESULTS HERE

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    Lelystad, Netherlands (27th Sept 2014): David Gilmour was the only skipper to keep a clean sheet in today’s light-air action at the Dutch Match Cup in Lelystad. Team Gilmour swept aside their fellow Western Australians in a 3-0 Quarter Final against Keith Swinton and Team Alpari FX. The young Aussies then took the first match of their Semi-Final against the reigning ISAF World Champions, Taylor Canfield and US One. This is Gilmour’s first full season as a Tour Card holder on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT) and reaching the Semi Final of this inaugural event is his best performance yet. Part of that could come down to the fact that the lightweight, asymmetric-spinnakered Maxfun25s are a new type of boat to everyone on the Tour. “The other teams have had a few years on the Tour to really learn how to get the best out of the other boats that we race,” said Gilmour, whose other job is steering a 49er skiff on the Olympic circuit. “Here I think we’re benefiting from the fact that everyone is still learning the boats, so we’re not suffering from a lack of experience compared with the others.” Racing the responsive Maxfun25s, his 49er experience seems to be helping Gilmour and his team of dinghy-racing experts, which includes British 49er sailor Ed Powys on mainsheet and tactics, along with Pete Nicholas and Luke Payne at the front, who together recently finished runner-up in the 505 World Championships. Mathieu Richard of LunaJets in action during the Quarter Finals of Dutch Match Cup © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT Canfield enjoyed a relaxing day watching the other crews battle their way through the light and shifting breezes of the Quarter Finals. “We had a great lunch, the restaurants have been doing a great job keeping us fed,” he said, although another part of him would have liked to have been out there gaining valuable hours on the water. “It’s the downside of going straight to the Semis. You come up against a sailor who has been racing all day in those conditions, which makes it a bit tough, but after our race against Gilmour this afternoon we've figured out a few things to do different tomorrow.” Event qualifier Arthur Herreman gave his fellow Frenchman a few scares in the Quarter-Final battle against Mathieu Richard. “Our 3-1 win doesn’t really tell you the story of how close it was against Arthur,” admitted Richard. “Perhaps we have been training too much with him! He has been learning the game very well.” Perhaps even Herreman was surprised to have made it so far in the competition, because as soon as his match against Richard was over, he high-tailed it on the five-hour drive south back to Normandy to fulfil his ceremonial duties as a witness at a friend’s wedding this evening. Ian Williams leading Phil Robertson in the Quarter Finals © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT The tensest Quarter Final duel was between Ian Williams and Phil Robertson. The Kiwis on WAKA Racing took the first two matches, leaving GAC Pindar with the daunting prospect of winning three in a row. However the four-time ISAF World Champion kept his nerve and managed to do exactly that. With Canfield selecting Gilmour as his Semi Final opponent, Williams and Richard were pitted against each other. “Ian has beaten us in all three of our knock-out matches at other events this year,” said Richard, “so we need to find a different strategy here.” So far so good for Richard and LunaJets, who narrowly beat Williams in the first Semi-Final match this afternoon. Gilmour took a more comfortable win against Canfield. With the 5 knot breeze vanishing to almost nothing, the rest of the Semi Finals would have to wait for tomorrow. Williams will take the break to analyse what GAC Pindar needs to do to counter the smooth and precise sailing of Richard. “It’s always difficult to beat Mathieu, especially in the light airs, and we'll have to bring a better game tomorrow if we're to move through to the Final.” The final day of racing takes place tomorrow, starting at 1000 (CET). Follow live race updates via Twitter at @wmrt_liverace. To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour  For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   Access all of today’s imagery via www.wmrt.photoshelter.com. For downloading pictures use the password: awmrt Stage 5 Dutch Match Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour Semi FinalsMathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets vs Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 1-0David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour vs Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 1-0 Quarter FinalsMathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets beat Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman 3-1David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour beat Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 3-0Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar beat Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 3-2 FULL RESULTS HERE

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    Lelystad, Netherlands (28th Sept 2014): Taylor Canfield and US One have won the inaugural Dutch Match Cup after a thrilling final against arch-rival Ian Williams and GAC Pindar. The breeze was very light and patchy, creating multiple opportunities for lead changes. No race lead, however big, was ever safe. Matches between the world’s top two match racing skippers are always aggressive affairs on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT). In the pre-start of the first match, Canfield stuck two penalties on Williams, leaving the British boat playing catch-up. However on the downwind leg, Williams found a sliver of stronger breeze by the harbour shore close to the cheering crowds in Lelystad. The British came close to rolling over the top of US One but failed to keep clear from a Canfield luff. Another penalty for Williams, then another penalty towards the leeward gate, and Canfield was uncatchable. 1-0. Pre start action between Ian Williams and Taylor Canfield in the finals of Dutch Match Cup © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT In the second match, Williams got the slightly better start and converted that into a five-length lead by the first windward mark. Canfield sailed over to the shore on the second beat and used the cheers of the crowd to waft him closer to Williams. GAC Pindar was still in the lead at the final turning mark, but US One again went shoreside and managed to sneak ahead of their opponent just before the finish. 2-0, and the Dutch Match Cup went to Canfield. In the Petit Final to determine 3rd overall, Mathieu Richard took the first match but David Gilmour bounced back to win the next two and secure his first podium finish at a Tour event. The LunaJets skipper will be kicking himself for some unforced errors earlier in the day, particularly at the finish of match 4 in his Semi Final against Williams. Richard had to offload a penalty at the finish, although he had a huge lead and was not under too much pressure. When the crew went to lower the spinnaker before turning up to begin their 270-degree penalty turn, the sail dropped in the water and started trawling behind the boat like a fishing net. In just 4 knots of wind, the boat’s all-important momentum was lost, the French boat hit the finish mark as they took their penalty around it, and Williams breezed past to secure his spot in the Final. A podium finish for David Gilmour - Team Gilmour © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT It was that kind of day - very, very easy to make mistakes or to fall into a hole as you watched your opponent sail on by. Gilmour took an easy win in his first Semi Final match against Canfield and was showing the kind of form that could have yielded overall victory. However in another match Gilmour seemed to have an unassailable lead but allowed too much separation on the final run. So often the chasing boat would take its chances by the shore, and would be frequently rewarded for doing so. You can’t give Canfield too much rope. Give him an inch, and he’ll take a mile, all done with an assassin’s smile. Back to back win for Taylor Canfield and his US One team © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT Canfield’s laid-back demeanour serves him well when the conditions get squirly. “It was never-say-die out there,” said Canfield, “and I have to pay tribute to my crew, Rod Dawson, Mike Rehe and Hayden Goodrick, for keeping at it, however we were doing in the race.” It was a vital win for the reigning World Champions who have a lot of work on to defend their crown against the frighteningly consistent GAC Pindar. Williams might have lost the battle, but the four-time World Champion is still winning the war. “Of course we’re disappointed not to have won here today, but we’re pleased to have made this the sixth final in a row that we’ve reached on the Tour, stretching back to Monsoon Cup last year. Congratulations to Taylor and US One, they sailed extremely well, and we look forward to the next one.” That ‘next one’ is the Argo Group Gold Cup in Bermuda in three weeks’ time. After the light and responsive Maxfun25s used in Lelystad, the larger and heavier International One Designs present a different kind of challenge. This was the first time that Holland has been represented on the Tour, and Canfield paid tribute to the organisers and people of Lelystad. “This has been a fantastic event, great people, great racing, and we can’t wait to come back next year.” To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Access all of today’s imagery via wmrt.photoshelter.com For downloading pictures use the password: awmrt Overall results of Stage 5 Dutch Match Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour 1 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One2 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar3 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour4 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets5 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari6 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing7 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman8 Björn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team9 Joachim Aschenbrenner (DEN) Aschenbrenner Racing Team10 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NLD) Opportunity Team11 Philip Bendon (IRL) Glenmar Racing Team12 Klaartje Zuiderbaan (NLD) Team BSC FinalsTaylor Canfield (ISV) US One beat Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 2-0 Petit-FinalsDavid Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour beat Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 2-1 Semi FinalsTaylor Canfield (ISV) US One beat David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 3-1Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar beat Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 3-1 Quarter FinalsMathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets beat Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman 3-1David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour beat Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 3-0Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar beat Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 3-2 Qualifying1 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 9-22 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 8-33 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 7.5-34 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 7-45 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 7-46 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 7-47 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman 6-58 Björn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 4.5-69 Joachim Aschenbrenner (DEN) Aschenbrenner Racing Team 4-710 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NLD) Opportunity Team 2-911 Philip Bendon (IRL) Glenmar Racing Team 2-912 Klaartje Zuiderbaan (NLD) Team BSC 1-10 2014 Leaderboard Standings after Stage 51 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 94pts2 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 88pts 3 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 76pts4 Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing 63pts5 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 58pts6 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 56pts7 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 39pts8 Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa 20pts FULL RESULTS HERE

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    Lelystad, Netherlands (27th Sept 2014): David Gilmour was the only skipper to keep a clean sheet in today’s light-air action at the Dutch Match Cup in Lelystad. Team Gilmour swept aside their fellow Western Australians in a 3-0 Quarter Final against Keith Swinton and Team Alpari FX. The young Aussies then took the first match of their Semi-Final against the reigning ISAF World Champions, Taylor Canfield and US One. This is Gilmour’s first full season as a Tour Card holder on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT) and reaching the Semi Final of this inaugural event is his best performance yet. Part of that could come down to the fact that the lightweight, asymmetric-spinnakered Maxfun25s are a new type of boat to everyone on the Tour. “The other teams have had a few years on the Tour to really learn how to get the best out of the other boats that we race,” said Gilmour, whose other job is steering a 49er skiff on the Olympic circuit. “Here I think we’re benefiting from the fact that everyone is still learning the boats, so we’re not suffering from a lack of experience compared with the others.” Racing the responsive Maxfun25s, his 49er experience seems to be helping Gilmour and his team of dinghy-racing experts, which includes British 49er sailor Ed Powys on mainsheet and tactics, along with Pete Nicholas and Luke Payne at the front, who together recently finished runner-up in the 505 World Championships. Mathieu Richard of LunaJets in action during the Quarter Finals of Dutch Match Cup © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT Canfield enjoyed a relaxing day watching the other crews battle their way through the light and shifting breezes of the Quarter Finals. “We had a great lunch, the restaurants have been doing a great job keeping us fed,” he said, although another part of him would have liked to have been out there gaining valuable hours on the water. “It’s the downside of going straight to the Semis. You come up against a sailor who has been racing all day in those conditions, which makes it a bit tough, but after our race against Gilmour this afternoon we've figured out a few things to do different tomorrow.” Event qualifier Arthur Herreman gave his fellow Frenchman a few scares in the Quarter-Final battle against Mathieu Richard. “Our 3-1 win doesn’t really tell you the story of how close it was against Arthur,” admitted Richard. “Perhaps we have been training too much with him! He has been learning the game very well.” Perhaps even Herreman was surprised to have made it so far in the competition, because as soon as his match against Richard was over, he high-tailed it on the five-hour drive south back to Normandy to fulfil his ceremonial duties as a witness at a friend’s wedding this evening. Ian Williams leading Phil Robertson in the Quarter Finals © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT The tensest Quarter Final duel was between Ian Williams and Phil Robertson. The Kiwis on WAKA Racing took the first two matches, leaving GAC Pindar with the daunting prospect of winning three in a row. However the four-time ISAF World Champion kept his nerve and managed to do exactly that. With Canfield selecting Gilmour as his Semi Final opponent, Williams and Richard were pitted against each other. “Ian has beaten us in all three of our knock-out matches at other events this year,” said Richard, “so we need to find a different strategy here.” So far so good for Richard and LunaJets, who narrowly beat Williams in the first Semi-Final match this afternoon. Gilmour took a more comfortable win against Canfield. With the 5 knot breeze vanishing to almost nothing, the rest of the Semi Finals would have to wait for tomorrow. Williams will take the break to analyse what GAC Pindar needs to do to counter the smooth and precise sailing of Richard. “It’s always difficult to beat Mathieu, especially in the light airs, and we'll have to bring a better game tomorrow if we're to move through to the Final.” The final day of racing takes place tomorrow, starting at 1000 (CET). Follow live race updates via Twitter at @wmrt_liverace. To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour  For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   Access all of today’s imagery via www.wmrt.photoshelter.com. For downloading pictures use the password: awmrt Stage 5 Dutch Match Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour Semi FinalsMathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets vs Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 1-0David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour vs Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 1-0 Quarter FinalsMathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets beat Arthur Herreman (FRA) Team Herreman 3-1David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour beat Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 3-0Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar beat Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 3-2 FULL RESULTS HERE

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    London, UK (27th June 2014): There is the two boat format and its unique set of rules, but what also differentiates match racing from any other genre of sailing is that crews must be able to jump from one type of boat to another between events while remaining competitive in the process. On the Alpari World Match Racing Tour this year for example, the teams sailed Match Race Germany aboard Bavaria 40 Match Race edition cruising yachts, and will move to the DS37 purpose-built match racing yachts next week for Stena Match Cup Sweden. Bavaria 40s is used for the Match Race Germany © Photo by Brian Carlin / AWMRT For Sopot they will compete in the Diamont 3000, a ‘conventional’ race yacht, typical of the 1990s, with in-line spreaders, running backstays and a conventional symmetric spinnaker. The next two events are in smaller, more modern, more nimble sportsboats, - the TOM 28, with symmetrical spinnaker, in Chicago and MaxFun25, with asymmetrical spinnaker at Dutch Match Cup. There is then a leap back in time, at the Argo Group Gold Cup in Bermuda, where a yacht designed in 1936 is used - the International One Design. The season concludes with the Foundation 36 racers used at the Monsoon Cup. Diamont 3000 is used for the Sopot Match Race © Photo by ShutterSail.com / AWMRT Just in this small group are boats with asymmetric and symmetric spinnakers (the latter using spinnaker poles, the former not), there are lightweight and heavyweight boats, boats with wheel steering and tiller steering, boats with running backstays and a fixed backstay and an age range from the contemporary back to an 80 year old classic. Obviously some teams prefer some types of boats over others, but success on the Tour requires crews to master them all, and to do so as quickly as possible, for teams there is two hours of official practice the day before racing begins though some teams try to fit in an extra day of training before that. International One Design is used for the Argo Group Gold Cup © Photo by OnEdition / AWMRT “One of the big challenges in the match racing circuit is getting used to the different types of boat that you sail around the world,” admits GAC Pindar skipper Ian Williams. He adds that some crews inevitably are more familiar with some of the boats than others, particularly if they are ‘local’ to them. “In the DS37s, we have maybe 15 weeks of experience now, but that is nothing like the experience of Bjorn [Hansen] or Johnnie [Berntsson], but it is an advantage over some of the newer guys, like David Gilmour.” Now one of the old hands on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, Williams remembers that when he first started out he seemed to do better at new events sailed in boats unfamiliar to the old hands, simply because no one held a ‘time in the boat’ advantage. Tom 28 is used for the Chicago Match Cup © Photo by Brian Carlin / AWMRT Aside from the different physical constraints, such as the type of helm and the spinnaker configuration, requiring the crew to adapt their roles on board, all of the boats also behave differently, particularly when it comes to acceleration and their turning ability – both vital features of match racing competition. Some lighter boats can be thrown around aggressively, whereas some other designs will simply come to a standstill if you treat them disrespectfully. Foundation 36 is used for the Monsoon Cup © Photo by Brian Carlin / AWMRT “There are a few moves, particularly in the low speed stuff, like in the dial-up that ends up specific to the boat, that you can manipulate,” continues Williams. “All boats accelerate slightly differently, so tacking styles are different between them. Some you have to press on with a firm trimmed genoa and some you have to ease the sails a bit more and come down a bit more to get it going. Learning about those idiosyncrasies across the difference conditions is important.” For the most part, skippers on the circuit like the challenge of sailing the different boats and that sailing them well is a vital skill for the successful match racer. As Bjorn Hansen observes: “You cannot win the World Championship by just being extremely good at sailing the DS37 or the IOD. You have to quickly adapt to new boats and sail all types of boats well. But that’s actually also a fun thing…” Mathieu Richard agrees that ‘adapting’ is the relevant word: “That’s one of the things I really like in match racing - having to adapt to all the different boats. I like the fact that we change boats and some teams feel better on the small boats and others feel better on big boats. My team, I think, we are quite good on every boat, which is one of our good points.” Keith Swinton also enjoys the variety. “It is one of the things that makes match racing fun, to sail different boats at different venues. It adds to the skill level of all the sailors. It keeps the playing field a bit more open as well. Some of the boats are better suited to the older guys and some of the younger guys might be better in the other boats, so it keeps a good balance.” Sailing the Alpari World Match Racing Tour in just one type of boat? That would make it just like any other circuit.http://design4u.kiev.ua/europosud.ua/

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    As the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour is about to get underway, the world's top match racing skippers lead an impressive line up of competitors for the 2014 World Championship title. Leading the pack is US Virgin Islander Taylor Canfield and his USOne team returning to defend their 2013 Championship title. Also keen to secure a record breaking fifth World Championship title is Ian Williams from Great Britain and his GAC Pindar team.  Get to know all about the 2014 Tour skippers in our latest Infographic showing their performances and Wins v Losses from last season. Who will lead the way in 2014 and lift the Alpari World Match Racing Tour trophy and become ISAF Match Racing World Champion?  You decide…. blog.livedoor.jp http://detective-nagoyashi.us http://europosud.uahttp://atl-service.kiev.ua/http://senordecor.com.ua

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    London, UK - 14 May 2012: Several rule changes have been confirmed for the 2012 Alpari World Match Racing Tour, coming into effect at the first event of the season, Match Race Germany in Langenargen on May 23 – 28. The Racing Rules have been amended in order to continue the positioning of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT) as the most compelling, competitive and pioneering action on the water. Craig Mitchell, Alpari World Match Racing Tour, Tour Director, expects the alterations to have a positive effect on the Tour, as well as match racing in general: “Match racing has evolved to the point where we currently have a great set of rules, producing some fantastic sporting action, as we saw quite clearly in the 2011 series. “Nothing major has changed in the past few years and we are enthusiastic in our responsibility to keep developing the rules to challenge our world class athletes and create the best possible spectacle we can.”

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    Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia – 27 November, 2011: Borrowing from the motor sports world, where the driver is in constant contact with his crew via radio comms, real-time coaching has made its debut today in the Quarter-Finals of the Monsoon Cup. Rule 41 of the Racing Rules of Sailing which normally prohibits ‘outside assistance’ has been amended here, so that coaches have been allowed to give advice and insight to their team via radio. Positioned on the third-floor balcony of the Ri-Yaz Heritage pavilion adjacent to the race course area, the coaches have an elevated view of the current and the wind, and can provide, when prompted, their insight on which side of the course to favour in each match.  Having been out on the water themselves and felt the pressure of having to read the course while under fire, the natural choices of coaches were from among skippers and crew who did not make the cut to the Quarter-Final round. When these choices were revealed on the evening prior to racing, it provided great entertainment, as erstwhile enemies now became allies in the fight that lie ahead: having just won his last deciding match by mere centimetres, Francesco Bruni naturally chose his hapless opponent, Torvar Mirsky, to be his coach, and Matthieu Richard was tapped by rival skipper Peter Gilmour YANMAR Racing to help lead him through his next round.  Kidding aside, this shows the depth of respect and trust the teams have in each other’s abilities, even as they have been battling each other throughout the season.  “The concept of prohibiting outside assistance goes back to racing on the Thames in the 19th century,” says Gilmour, who proposed to try this at the Monsoon Cup. “Back then when the tide changed, a boat could hand off their anchor line to someone ashore, who could then tow them up the course. So the principal of being self-reliant became rooted in the game, and not until recently has this changed.”  And the change has been considerable: few yachts venture anywhere now without a GPS, most offshore races now allow weather routing help through downloads of grib files, and the advent of sophisticated electronic tools and modern telecommunications has brought offshore sailors to all new levels of accuracy and access. Most aspects of our lives can now be influenced and enhanced by having access to information made readily available – look at the explosion in apps for iPhones, iPads, and the like.  So it’s not a long stretch to accept real-time coaching help to increase the performance level of the teams, and help allow the game evolve in some new and interesting ways, especially if adopted at other match racing events. Coach positioning, for example, can play a huge role, and not every venue will have the bird’s eye view afforded here in Kuala Terengganu. Will coaches then be allowed.  out on other areas of the course, on the water or even in the air? And what about at the lower levels of the game where teams are still learning: would it be right for the coach to tell them how to execute a difficult manoeuvre and provide detailed tactical advice, rather then just observations of the race course? If so, who will police this?  And once coaches are accepted onto the competitor’s boats, what’s to keep them off the umpire boats as well? Most umpires agree that the integrity of most calls are made based on good positioning, and even the best umpires can find themselves out of position when a good call is needed. Can a coach possibly help them as well? An electronic variant of this concept devised by Stan Honey and his team is already in play at the America’s Cup World Series, where umpire calls are made based on highly-accurate telemetry brought to match umpires pouring over their screens. Honey says the debriefs are no longer arguments about the facts of positioning – the telemetry settles this to within centimetres – but about the tactical options and rules that apply.  But here at the Monsoon Cup the input provided by coaches was more factual than directive: where the wind shift was seen to be, what side of the course seemed to have better current, etc., and not direct advice on what side of the start line or upwind leg to favour.  One team that enjoyed the most success from the coaching was newly-crowned World Champion Ian Williams Team GAC Pindar, who had already signed up 49er Olympic Silver Medallist Ian Barker to help them read the course area. And while not a match racer per se, Barker does, however, have tremendous coaching experience for Olympic aspirants, and was already on his way to coach at the ISAF Sailing World Championships the following week in Perth. With Barker’s help, Williams won the overall World Championship title in the Quarter Final, sailing a course area strewn with tricky current eddies and wind shifts.  Perhaps ironically, the teams with skippers as coaches did not fair so well: Mirsky’s Bruni went down 1-3 to Williams, and Richard’s Gilmour lost 1-3 to Johnnie Berntsson.  But not having a coach had its perils as well: both Will Tiller and Phil Robertson eschewed their option to take on a coach, and both lost to their rivals by close scores of 2-3.  How much will coaching be used in future Tour events? Probably more, as the Tour seeks to embrace new ways to enhance the excitement level even more, both on and off the water. - Article provided by Dobbs Davishttp://sites.google.com http://www.man-ms.com.ua www.europosud.uawww.mexes.com.ua/http://www.np.com.ua

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    Langenargen, Germany (9th June 2014): Downunder, where chief umpire Bill Edgerton comes from, there’s a children’s character called Blinky Bill, a laid-back cuddly cartoon Koala. But if the sailors on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour think they can pull the blinkers over their on-the-water officials, they’ve got another thing coming. Edgerton (known to some as Complicated Bill) and his colleagues are wise to their mischievous tricks. Most of the boats used on the Alpari World Match Race Tour are tiller-steered, but at Match Race Germany, the Bavaria 40 keelboat is equipped with a wheel. This offers the cheekier skippers a new opportunity to pull the wool over the eyes of the umpires. Just as professional footballers are prone to tripping over a blade of grass on the edge of the penalty box, sailors are not immune to similar forms of dyspraxia. Tight situations sometimes tempt sailors into the dark art of dissimulation. But Complicated Bill is on to them: “They're playing to the umpires! They're trying to gain an advantage, and it's a game between us and them. “They're always trying to show that they're doing what they need to stay out of trouble, and we're always looking to see that they're doing enough. So, they can exaggerate the drama of the situation and make it look as though it's more dramatic than it is in reality. But it's not as bad as a dive in football. “When you need to keep clear, you have to turn the boat, and if you're not close enough or not watching closely, they can slide their hands over the top of the wheel without actually turning it, saying, ‘Look, I'm going as hard as I can!’” Little beknown to the offending skipper, Edgerton is looking further down - below the waterline - for evidence of whether or not they’re really trying. “Actually if you're looking at the rudder you see there's no turning of the rudder whatsoever. It's up to us to try and satisfy ourselves if they are really doing everything they can, or if they're just playing a game.”news88.net http://www.europosud.ua http://motioncrisp.wordpress.comevakuator-servis.com/http://www.galid.com/

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    Langenargen, Germany (8th June 2014): Being a professional sailor isn’t just about being able to sail a boat fast, it’s about conducting yourself in a professional manner in every respect. It’s what you do off the water that counts too, such as negotiating with commercial partners who can help fund the costs of competing on a global circuit. French skipper Mathieu Richard has shown a useful knack of being able to sign a sponsor who can help his team perform on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. Last year, despite lacking a Tour Card, Richard succeeded in finding a sponsor in GEFCO who helped him compete on a number of events as a Wild Card holder. Victory at the Korea Match Cup and some other great performances were sufficient to get him back into this year’s circuit as one of the eight Tour Card holders. “It's a great feeling to be back as a Tour Card holder, because the last time was in 2011. We managed to get a new sponsorship with LunaJets, so they are following us for this season. I'm very excited and very glad to be on the Tour with my team, which is the same team pretty much as last year.” LunaJets, a private jet brokerage based in Geneva, already supported Richard on the RC44 circuit. “When I asked them if they wanted to go on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, they immediately said yes, so they are very excited to be on the circuit with us. We hope we can repay their faith in us. They are very sensitive to the fact that it's a World Championship and we are a very high level team and we are fighting for the victory, for the title. They like this very much.” Richard has a very diverse background in racing, with world championship wins as a tactician in keelboats like the Mumm 30 and fast multihulls the ORMA 60 offshore trimarans. He has won the offshore challenge, the Tour de France a la Voile, four times, but in the past decade he has increasingly focused on match racing. Victory at the European Match Racing Championship in 2004 showed what he could do, and since then he has finished runner-up in the Tour in 2007. He has been a world force in match racing ever since. Richard attributes his success to having raced with a core of friends for a very long time. “I started match racing with Greg, my tactician, more than 15 years ago, so it's really been a while. Then Thierry and Olivier have been with me for eight or nine years. Francois Verdier, the bowman, started with me two years ago and Pascal Rambeau, the same.” While he’s competing in a combative part of the sport, Richard maintains a placid demeanour. “I am not sure I am very aggressive, definitely some are more so, like Bjorn Hansen; even the young guys, Robertson, Swinton, they like to be aggressive. It is not in my nature to be so aggressive. I try to stay smooth on the course to keep the boat fast and we also have good skills in terms of tactics on board with Greg as tactician. It's difficult to say just one good point about the team, we have a lot of skills and I think we are pretty strong in all parts of the game.” Aged 38, he is one of the older skippers on the Tour, but with many good years remaining, and with as much enthusiasm for the sport as ever, he says. “Obviously you haven't got the same spirit when you are 20 as when you are 38. When you are 20 you are starting out, and you are probably a bit fresher and looking at racing with, I wouldn't say more enthusiasm, but you discover everything for the first time. When you get a bit more experienced you know how it works, it's a bit different. You can bet on your experience to beat the others - and that's what we are trying to do.” But is there a danger of relying on experience too much, of not trying new ideas any more? “Not really, because sailing is a game in which you always try to improve every day. Even if I started match racing 15 years ago, I am always trying to improve and thinking about the moves, the start, the trimming etc. You are never satisfied with your level. It's about trying to improve all the time. Experience is a good asset, but you have to always be looking for new tricks.”http://online.casinocity.com evakuator-servis.com http://europosud.uawww.evakuator-servis.comhttp://goodportal.com.ua/

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    London, UK (20th June 2014): The Batavia Sailing Center today selected the Batavia Regatta, which will run over 23 - 24 August 2014 at the Bataviahaven of Lelystad, Holland, as the official Qualifying event for the Dutch Match Cup 2014. The Batavia Sailing Center is the organiser of the Dutch Match Cup the recently announced Stage of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. For teams wishing to race in the Dutch Match Cup two Qualification places are available. Both the winner and the runner up of the Batavia Regatta will receive an invite to the Dutch Match Cup which will be held between 24-28 September this year. The Dutch Match Cup and the Batavia Regatta will be sailed in MaxFun 25 boats with the race area directly in front of the port of Bataviahaven, very close to the shore, offering fantastic opportunities for spectators to enjoy the action. The organization of the Dutch Match Cup has two further Wild Card invites which will be decided upon later in the year. Batavia Regatta The Batavia Regatta will be an ISAF Grade 3 match racing event. Further information about invites to the Batavia Regatta and the NoRcan be found at www.dutchmatchcup.nl/qualifier/jobtalk.jp http://www.budmag.ua http://www.progressive.uawww.dxtranse.com.ua/europosud.ua/

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    London, UK (17th June): It was a great weekend at the Chicago Match Cup Qualifier, a ISAF Grade 2 event that feeds into the only American stop on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, the Chicago Match Cup. With blustery conditions over the Chicago's Belmont Harbor, Chris Steele from the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and his team of Walker Banks on Main, Hamish Hardy on Jib and Tim Siemers on Bow took the advantage to win from behind against Australia's David Chapman 2-1 to win the ISAF Grade 2 Chicago Match Cup Qualifier. "This was a tough series, and I credit my team for pulling us through some critical matches yesterday and then again today to take this win," said Steele. "The racing here was great, and I'm really looking forward to coming back to compete at the Tour event in September." The Finals started well for Chapman, who scoring first blood and put Steele under pressure to win the second match and stay alive for the series. Steele and team did exactly this, setting the stage for a dramatic final showdown. In this last match, Chapman took what looked to be a commanding lead, which on the first downwind leg looked safe at 10 lengths. But then Steele surfed a wave into the bottom gate, acquired right of way, and when Chapman did not yield and came out in front, the match umpires gave him a red flag penalty, requiring an immediate penalty turn. This allowed Steele to take the lead and sail to victory. Racing in 15-20 knots and lumpy seas, Steele's road to victory started with being down 2-0 to CMRC's Don Wilson in the Semi-Final, and then coming back to win the next three to go to the Final to meet Australia's David Chapman, who won 3-0 over Steve Lowery. The race conditions then became trickier with winds picking up to 30 knots and seas building even higher, hence the race managers of Chicago Match Race Centre decided to put up the Z flag to indicate that spinnaker use would not be allowed. In the one-match sudden death Petit Final, favorite Don Wilson defeated Steve Lowery to take third place overall in the event. Petit Final action between Don Wilson and Steve Lowery Steele's only other appearance was at last August's Grade 2 Grand Slam event, where he finished second in a field of 12 teams from six nations. Finishing on top at this event, Steele will have to prove and demonstrate his skills that he can be one of the best to compete at an Alpari World Tour event. The 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour championship will visit the US in September at the Chicago Match Cup, the only American stop after Stage 4, the Sopot Match Race, in Poland, . The Alpari World Match Racing Tour is one of five special events sanctioned under the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) including America’s Cup, the Volvo Ocean Race, the Extreme Sailing Series and the PWA World Tour. Chicago Match Cup Qualifier Final results:1. Chris Steele (NZL)2. David Chapman (AUS)3. Don Wilson (USA)4. Steve Lowery (USA)5. Stefan Lindberg (FIN)6. Scott Dickson (NZL)7. David Storrs (USA)8. Chris Poole (USA)9. Tyler Rice (ISV)10. David Niemann (USA)http://www.kuchikomi.miraifx.com chimtorg.com.ua nikolasgeekfinder.wordpress.comhttp://www.europosud.uaeuroposud.ua/

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FEATURED SKIPPER

Skipper - Sweden

Bjorn Hansen is one of many top Scandinavian helmsmen to have featured regularly on the fixture list of the Alpari World Tour after he started match racing in 1994. A consistent name in the top 10 on the ISAF Match Race World Rankings is testimony to how difficult he is to beat, especially at his favoured venues.

Match Cup Sweden, his home event, is one such venue and it gave him his fi...

STRONG TRADITIONS

Old traditions but humble minds

It has taken many years for competitive sailing to capture the public imagination and it has taken a return to basic principles to make it happen. Right at the beginning of yacht racing, in the 17th century, races took place between two boats going down the river to the sea and back, and crowds lined the sides of the river to watch it happening. It was easy to understand, because the first one home won, it was exciting and it was a marvellous spectacle.

Over the years, as is so often the way with sport, the experts refined the rules, introduced handicaps and developed a language that ensured that only a rarefied breed of sailor – usually a member of an exclusive club – would understand what was going on and very often even he would not. The wider audience didn’

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